Take back your online privacy

In light of Edward Snowden’s recent disclosure of the PRISM surveillance program, it is becoming increasingly clear that Western democratic governments are heading towards an increasing level of control over online traffic, at the expense of privacy. But the major threat to privacy is not there – it is in our own complacency and lack of technical ability to do anything about it. Here are four things you can and should do to improve your privacy online.

In light of Edward Snowden’s recent disclosure of the PRISM surveillance program, it is becoming clear that Western democratic governments are heading towards an ever-increasing level of control over online traffic, at the expense of privacy. Tools like deep-packet inspection (which allows advanced content monitoring and filtering), corporate willingness to give away customer data, and international agreements┬ámake it increasingly difficult to maintain a modicum of anonymity and confidentiality online. But the major threat to privacy is not there – it is in our own complacency and lack of technical ability to do anything about it. We readily disclose so much information online so carelessly, that, while it does not excuse the snooping behavior of the states and businesses, it certainly makes the job a lot easier for them. Here are four things you can and should do to improve your privacy online – and that does not include the obvious of securing your facebook profile!
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